Press Release

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New paintings by Lisa Sanditz engage a notion of the sublime landscape. Wherein her last body of work, the seasonal paintings by Breughel offered a framework on which images of outdoor sports culture were invoked. These new works find their source and modality from a series of road trips across the country, serving as both vignettes of rural American peculiarity and as accounts of commercialization and its dialogue with the surrounding wilderness. The painting “Organized Living”, from which the exhibition takes its title, presents a big-box-style home-organization store through a composite of modernist painting motifs that reference in part the modular and commercially dictated construction methods of these familiar structures. A dizzying checkerboard pattern facade rendered in the painting that makes gestures of the store’s actual signage and accents the strip-mall’s haphazard design. “The Village of Hiddenbrooke,” depicts a housing development commercially endorsed by the artist, Thomas Kinkade. Sparsely landscaped and sitting packed into an arid California valley, the community is a sharp contrast to the nostalgic vistas Kinkade reveres. “Earthships and Their Neighbors,” however, depicts a community built from recycled materials and alternative energy. These structures seem integrated with their environment, mimicking the mesas and terrain that surround them in a seemingly symbiotic relationship. The painted surfaces are constructed as organically and illogically as the landscapes from which they came. While holding a more conventional sense of pictorial space, the paintings are amok with different gestural styles, as the abstracted and the represented take form on the canvas. Often times a lineage of the material paint and its representational forms can be clearly seen in the places Sanditz has observed; while at others it is more loose, layered, and careless, perhaps hoping to recall a memory of a previous or unmitigated state in the countryside. The densely painted surface and wide-open spaces on the canvas try to convey both a sense of hope and emptiness, a feeling both critical and celebratory of the American landscape. Concurrently on view is Lisa Sanditz’s mural at Canal and Green Streets in Lower Manhattan. One of three murals produced by United Technologies and Creative Time as part of United Technologies celebration of 25 years of support for the arts. Other artists involved include Gary Hume and Alex Katz.

Participating Artists:

Lisa Sanditz